Events Calendar

 

The Master of Arts in Holocaust and Genocide Studies program at Kean University

All events, except as noted, are free ($10 suggested donation at the door) and open to the public. For directions to Kean University and to event venues, click here. Except as noted events do not require advance registration and are cosponsored by the Master of Arts in Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Jewish Studies Program, Holocaust Resource Center, and Human Rights Institute. Free parking permitted in white-line spaces only. 

For details about the MA in Holocaust and Genocide Studies program, contact dklein@kean.edu. To make these and other events possible, Support Us

 

OCTOBER

Wednesday, October 18 at 2:00 pm in HRI 201: "Can Genocide Be Prevented?" Join speakers from Srdjan Hercigonj, from Serbia, and Lydia Mugambe, from Uganda, who are involved in rebuilding societies after genocide in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Rwanda.
 
Tuesday, October 24 at 11 am in the MSC Little Theatre: "The Holocaust from the Vantage Point of Contemporary Berlin" with Mahgs degree candidates Sarah Coykendall and Ellen Johnson. Part of the CLA series of lectures and panels.
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Tuesday, October 24 at 12:45 pmMaster of Arts in Holocaust and Genocide Studies Information Session; Townsend 117.
 
Tuesday, October 24 at 7:30 pmMaster of Arts in Holocaust and Genocide Studies Information Session; Townsend 111. 
 
Monday, October 30 at 4:30 pm: “Contemporary Antisemitism,” with Drs. Gilbert Kahn, Dennis Klein, C. Brid Nicholson, and other graduate faculty of the MA in Holocaust and Studies program; a College of Liberal Arts symposium co-sponsored by the Master of Arts in Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Jewish Studies Program, and Department of History; Hennings Hall 113
NOVEMBER 
 
Tuesday, November 14 at 3:15pm: "Global Harvest," come see Jewish Studies, Hillel, and other interdisciplinary studies at a global Thanksgiving to share food from multpile communities. Located at Miron Student Center room 315.
 
DECEMBER
 
Monday, December 4 at 7 pm: "Why? Explaining the Holocaust," the 2017 Murray Pantirer Memorial Scholar Lecture by Peter Hayes sponsored by the Holocaust Resource Center with support from the MA in Holocaust and Genocide Studies program and the Jewish Studies program; STEM Building Auditorium.
 
Tuesday, December 5 at 3:30pm" "How the 'Bystander' Became the Subject of Investigation and Fascination." Kean University Faculty Seminar, co-chaired by  Drs. Dennis Klein and Donald Marks. The seminar will explore the reasons for endemic, collective inaction and indifference when a crisis or violation demands interference. If interested, request advance readings by emailing seminar coordinator Aaron Gubi at at gubia@kean.edu. Cosponsored by Interdisciplinary Studies Center, Jewish Studies program, Masters of Arts in Holocaust and Genocide Studies program, and  Phi Kappa Phi  Honor Society. Located in CAS 205. 
 
JANUARY
 
Sunday, January 28 at 9:00-2:00pm: Master of Arts in Holocaust and Genocide Studies Admissions Information Session, on the East Campus.
 

FEBRUARY 

February 20 at 7 pm: "Can Jews Flourish Without a Crisis?," a lecture by Dr. Dennis Klein at the Sholom Club, 650 Valley Road, Clifton, NJ. For details, call Janice Liebman, 516-721-2261.

MARCH
 
March 8-9: "Memorialization Unmoored: The Visualization of Material Mediums of Social Memory," a symposium exploring the influence of non-state actors, such as private individuals, NGOs, and charitable foundations, on understanding war and genocide and commemorating victims  of mass violence. Submit an abstract of your proposed contribution to Eve Zucker at eve.zucker@yale.edu by January 5. The conference will take place at Yale University as part of a series of symposia convened by the Reflections in the Aftermath of War and Genocide Consortium, a coalition of scholars and practitioners affiliated with Cornell University, Kean University, Georgia State University, and Yale University committed to exploring the aftermaths of genocide. 
 
APRIL
Genocide Awareness Month
 
Wednesday, April 18 at 5:00-6:00 pm: MA in Holocaust and Genocide Studies admissions information session, Townsend Hall 117.

Thursday, April 19 1-5pm and Friday, April 20 9-5pm: 4th Master Seminar on Post-Genocide: Justice After Atrocity? Facilitated by Lawrence Douglass, James J. Grosfeld Professor of Law, Jurisprudence & Social Thought, Amherst College in the Human Rights Institute. This year’s seminar is designed especially for college seniors and faculty and is by invitation only. If you are interested in participating and presenting your research, submit an 250-word abstract by March 1 of a paper in progress or recently completed dealing with the seminar theme to dklein@kean.edu. The seminar is cosponsored by the Reflections in the Aftermath of War and Genocide Consortium, a coalition of scholars and practitioners committed to exploring the aftermaths of genocide affiliated with Cornell University, Kean University, Georgia State University, and Yale University.

Thursday, April 19 7:30pm: "Crimes of War, Crimes of Atrocity: The Possibility of Justice," a lecture by Lawrence Douglas, James J. Grosfeld Professor of Law, Jurisprudence & Social Thought, Amherst College. Beginning at Nuremberg, prosecutors and jurists have labored to bring the perpetrators of the worst war crimes and crimes against humanity to justice. Drawing on trials involving perpetrators of the Holocaust, the Rwandan genocide and the Yugoslavian civil war, this lecture will provide insight into the successes – and shortcomings – of these remarkable efforts. Located in Kean Hall 127. 

Friday, April 20, 9-5 pm: Resumption of the 4th Master Seminar on Post-Genocide. See April 19, above.

Tuesday, April 24 at 3:30-4:30pm: "Can Educators Prevent Genocide?" Graduate faculty Drs. Jan Balakian, Sue Gronewold, and Dennis Klein, and Holocaust and Genocide Studies masters degree candidate Mary Cokeing, challenge the belief that teaching tolerance and respect for others can significantly reduce the chances for genocide. Human Rights Institute, Rm. 201

Tuesday, April 24 4:30-5:30pm: "Enter 'The Bystander': The 1964 Murder of Kitty Genovese," Graduate faculty Drs. Dennis Klein and Don Marks, and graduate student Arielle Bernstein, revisit the Kitty Genovese murder to explore the heightening of attention to “the bystander” inspired by this case; the subsequent fascination with alleged bystander indifference even when, as scholars and forensic specialists discovered, witnesses to Kitty Genovese’s murder were few and, in at least one instance, intervened; and how the bystander fascination has overshadowed the real story of street violence. Located in the Human Rights Institute.

Tuesday, April 24 7:30-9:00pm: "Casablanca, Hitler’s Refugees, and the Hollywood Screen," A PowerPoint lecture by Noah Isenberg. Casablanca (1942), one of the all-time most cherished love stories and wartime dramas of the studio era is, surprisingly, one of the earliest and most successful feature films to address, often furtively, the menace of National Socialism, the flight of European refugees, and the dozens of refugees at work on both sides of the camera. Noah Isenberg, Professor of Culture and Media at the New School, in New York City, and author of We’ll Always Have Casablanca: The Life, Legend, and Afterlife of Hollywood’s Most Beloved Movie, sheds new light on these often neglected aspects of this iconic film. Located in CAS 106.  

Wednesday, April 25 at 3:00-4:30pm: "The Historical Legacy of Kristallnacht: Is Violence a Precondition of Genocide?" A graduate student panel. Students Michael Carter, Isabella Costa, Sarah Coykendall, and Ellen Johnson, degree candidates in the Master of Arts in Holocaust and Genocide Studies program, will explore the links between severe but limited violence and mass murder – in Germany and elsewhere; Human Rights Institute, Rm. 201.

Wednesday, April 25 at 4:30-6:30pm: Emerging Research in Holocaust and Genocide StudiesA graduate thesis forum. Exceptional degree candidates in the Master of Arts in Holocaust and Genocide Studies program present the results of their original research on Germany, Darfur, Haiti, U.S. reactions to genocide, and on recent developments in education; Human Rights Insitute, Rm. 201.